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What keeps family law lawyers up at night? Self-represented parties

October 21, 2014 By: TimLemieux Category: Family law

Like many areas of practice, family law is going through a period of change. Both clients and their lawyers are questioning traditional modes of practice. Economic woes both cause legal problems, and leave clients with limited resources with which to resolve them. Stress – for both families in crisis and for their lawyers – is a constant reality. Still, within this challenging climate, family lawyers are expected to work diligently and professionally in the service of their clients’ interests.

To understand how the bar is coping with the demands of modern family law practice, we invited a sampling of lawyers from across the province to answer the question “What keeps you up at night?”

Helene Desormeau and Christopher Giggey are partners in a Cornwall family law practice. Each identified self-represented family litigants as an issue of particular concern. Ms. Desormeau’s comments focus on access to justice, particularly for victims of family violence; Mr. Giggey talks about the challenges of representing a family law client where the opponent lacks representation.

Helene Desormeau
The problem
I’m concerned when I encounter victims of domestic violence who earn under $19,000 annually or who are in receipt of public assistance, but who are refused traditional legal aid because the violence was “not serious enough.” I have also encountered people who have to go to court because they are afraid that the ex-partner will attend to kidnap the children, but who don’t qualify for legal aid because the ex-partner lives 200 kilometres away; or men or women forced to bring motions to vary support after a drastic change in financial circumstances (such as losing their employment) who must attend court without legal counsel. Although the situations described above are serious from my perspective, they do not qualify for legal aid.

What helps
I’ve served as family court duty counsel, and I’ve assisted in the local Family Law Information Centre. Also, I often accept clients funded under special domestic violence duty counsel certificates. These certificates – often issued by shelters – entitle the recipient to two hours of legal assistance. Two hours is usually not enough time to meaningfully help someone in dealing with the breakdown of the relationship, to provide advice about legal rights and possible remedies, or to assist these people in cutting through the cobwebs of the legal issues they face. In many cases, all I can do is draft pleadings for these clients so that they at least have a good first step into the family court world.

The bigger challenge
Duty counsel and advice lawyers from the Family Law Information Centre are generally extremely knowledgeable and exceptionally helpful and patient. However, they often lack the time to follow a matter through, especially when both sides tend to be self-represented.

And they cannot shelter victims of violence by sending correspondence on their behalf, or by ensuring that the aggressor does not have their personal contact information. When unrepresented, the victims of domestic violence may continue to be victimized by the aggressor by having to communicate directly with that person, often when they are at their weakest. Legal aid budgets and services continue to shrink; if this trend continues, the only people likely to have legal counsel in family court are those who earn substantially over $50,000 annually, and can afford to privately retain a lawyer

Christopher Giggey
The problem
The ever-increasing proportion of self-represented litigants in family court means the proceedings often become protracted and more time intensive, due in part to the fact that the other side does not have the benefit of ongoing legal representation. This can translate into increased legal fees for represented clients, because additional time must often be spent in dealing directly with opponents who have a limited understanding of the law and of legal procedure.

What helps
In my initial correspondence to the self-represented litigant, I set out my obligations under rule 2.04(14) of the Rules of Professional Conduct. Notwithstanding this, I have found that the self-represented litigant will attempt to obtain direction – and sometimes legal advice – from me. As a result, it often becomes necessary to remind the other party of my role and my obligations throughout the proceeding.

Sometimes a self-represented opponent sends an unmanageable volume of email; when this happens, I have followed the suggestion of other lawyers, and have asked that all future correspondence be via mailed letter. I also take the time to explain to my client, at the outset of the retainer, that courts may provide a self-represented party with some leeway in presenting their case and complying with deadlines. Hopefully, this assists in managing their expectations down the road, when procedures are relaxed somewhat to account for a party being self-represented.

Advice for new lawyers
Establish contacts with more senior lawyers in your area of practice. Senior counsel are usually more than willing to pass on their knowledge and experience. There will come a time when you need to rely on this support network, and therefore, you should ensure that it is in place at the outset.

The full article can be found in the August 2012 issue of LAWPRO Magazine. All past LAWPRO Magazine articles can be found at www.lawpro.ca/magazinearchives

Commercial debt collection scam using the names Andreas Foglar and Eisen-Dorn

October 21, 2014 By: FraudInfo Category: Confirmed frauds

Firms in Ontario and New Mexico notified us that they received an email from the purported Andreas Foglar of Eisen-Dorn looking to retain them with regards to a commercial debt collection.

This is a classic bad cheque scam that presents as legal matter requiring the assistance of a lawyer. In this scam lawyers will be duped into wiring real funds from their trust accounts after depositing a fake cheque received as payment from the debtor (who is part of the fraud). See our Confirmed Fraud Page for more of an explanation of how these frauds work and to see other names associated with it. Our Fraud Fact Sheet lists the red flags of a bogus legal matter that is really a fraud.

Here is the initial email from the fraudster to the lawyer:

From: ANDREAS DEINHARDSTEIN [mailto:andreas.foglar-deinhardsteini@fdblawyer.com]
Sent: Thursday, October 09, 2014 8:35 AM
To:
Subject: CONTRACT NEGOTIATION

I am soliciting for your assistance for legal representation on behalf of my Client [EISEN DORN] in a breach of contract case in your jurisdiction.

DR ANDREAS FOGLAR-DEINHARDSTEIN * PARTNER FOGLAR-DEINHARDSTEIN PLANKENGASSE 7 * A-1015 VIENNA * AUSTRIA P.O. BOX 38 * WWW.FDBLAWYERS.COM DIRECT TELEPHONE: 612-610-03956 * FACSIMILE: 612-601-3959

Replying to the email brought this response:

We would like to thank you for your response to our inquiry for legal services. However, We wish to inform you that we would be needing your firms legal help to assist us with a breach of contract matter and also retrieve funds owed to our company. The contract of sales was signed on the 7th March 2014, Seller [ACE HARDWARE] was suppose to deliver to us the buyer on or before 2rd April 2014. However, ACE HARDWARE delivered some of the product to us on the 2rd April 2014 and promised to have the balance product delivered to us within 2weeks, because they had issues in the manufacturing of the balance product. The deadline date for the balance delivery was extended to 16th April 2014 as requested by ACE HARDWARE. Quite unfortunately, the extended deadline was not honoured.
We ordered hardware device from ACE HARDWARE, the total contract sum of $947,697was paid in full for the goods to be delivered to us. Parts of the products we order were delivered leaving a balance goods what $659,548 undelivered, up till date the remaining product were not delivered. We decided to call off the delivery of the balance product and requested for refunds but they have refused to make the refund to us. The amount in dispute is $647,697
We had a cordial and successful business relationship with ACE HARDWARE over the years, We are hoping to maintain this relationship after settling this issue.
If retained our expectation from your firm will be within the scenario of an engagement letter to our client. We believe this will trigger a positive response from them towards amicable settlement otherwise we will not hesitate to go into court litigation. We are prepared to pay your retainer fees and any other fees incurred during the course of this mater.
ACE HARDWARE
8201 Golf Course Rd NW # E Albuquerque, NM 87120
See attached documents relating to this transaction for your review. Please send to me your standard retainer agreement and address the retainer agreement to Will Kommen the Chief Executive Officer.

Regards,
Marilyn Lester
Accounts Payable Manager
Eisen Dorn
Praterstr. 9
1020 Vienna, Austria
Eisendorn.at
Tel: 612-617-20249
Fax: 612-610-83541

How to handle a real or suspected fraud Read the rest of this entry →

Cultural competence: An essential skill in an increasingly diverse world

October 17, 2014 By: TimLemieux Category: Communication errors

With each passing day, the legal profession becomes ever more diverse. That diversity brings challenges and opportunities. LAWPRO turned to diversity specialist Ritu Bhasin, Founder and President of bhasin consulting inc., for practical advice about the steps that lawyers and firms can take to welcome lawyers regardless of their personal and cultural identity characteristics, and to foster productive and creative collaboration.

What is cultural competence?
Bhasin defines cultural competence as “how we connect with people who are different from us.” Cultural competence is the ability to relate to others comfortably, respectfully and productively. Being able to effectively connect with people who are different from us – not only based on our similarities, but also with respect to differences – is the hallmark of cultural competence, and requires, as a prerequisite, the building of “cultural awareness.”

When asked what someone’s “culture” is, most people think of ethnicity. But when speaking in terms of cultural competence, culture is defined much more broadly and describes those aspects of a person’s values and behaviour that are connected to his or her personal identity characteristics. Beyond ethnicity, these characteristics may include gender, sexual orientation, age, religious beliefs, physical and intellectual abilities, and other characteristics.

While a firm can encourage lawyers to increase their cultural competence, success will depend on each lawyer increasing his or her own cultural awareness. Bhasin explains that most Canadians have been raised to intentionally ignore culture differences and to “treat everyone the same.” This “minimization” approach to culture, she notes, is less effective than approaches that strive for conscious acceptance of cultural differences, and active adaptation. The Intercultural Development Inventory, or IDI, developed by Mitchell Hammer, Ph.D., is a cross-culturally validated assessment of intercultural competence that measures cultural competence across five primary mind/skill sets that range from denial, through polarization, minimization, acceptance and adaptation.

When asked to explain what cultural competence looks like in practice across this continuum, Bhasin describes a lawyer who can identify, understand, and adjust to cultural dimensions of others’ behaviour. Learning how to do this requires not only knowledge of behavioural predictors, but also a willingness to actively learn and adapt.

Instead of trying to be “culture-blind” (a common strategy of minimization), a culturally competent lawyer should strive to build a working knowledge of behavioural predictors: cultural dimensions of behaviour that are shared by the majority of individuals within a cultural identity. Unlike stereotypes, behavioural predictors are grounded in science (for example, anthropology or sociology) and allow the user to assess a person’s behaviour against cultural generalizations.

Click here to read the full article, which appeared in the September 2014 issue of LAWPRO Magazine. All past LAWPRO Magazine articles can be found at www.lawpro.ca/magazinearchives

Title insurance policies are like a box of chocolates – No two policies are the same

October 16, 2014 By: TimLemieux Category: Real estate, Title insurance

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“The lawyer should be knowledgeable about title insurance and discuss with the client the advantages, conditions, and limitations of the various options and coverages generally available to the client through title insurance,” states Rule 2.02(10) of the Rules of Professional Conduct.

This obligation was brought home in a recent malpractice case where the lawyer did not properly address the protection title insurance would afford the client and did not fully investigate the issue at hand.

In this case, a city-owned laneway ran through a lot being purchased and underneath a long-standing (86 years) building. The lawyer indicated to the client that it was a minor issue, quickly resolvable after closing and that title insurance could cover it.

The title insurer provided a policy on a “forced removal basis” only. This required the title insurer to respond only in the event the city requested the building removed. Instead, the city wanted to be paid fair market value for the lane, an additional cost that diminished the property’s value. This was not covered by the policy the lawyer obtained, but might have been taken care of by a full coverage policy. The lesson? Not all title policies are created equal.

What’s really covered?
Understanding specific policy coverages is imperative for advising clients on all potential issues. Only with all the required information can the client decide to accept the limited coverage or direct the lawyer to undertake other searches or due diligence measures to understand the extent of the issue or remedy the matter.

Failure by the lawyer to advise the client in this instance was determined by the court to be negligence. Interestingly, if the lawyer had obtained a TitlePLUS policy on the same terms, both the client and lawyer would have been protected. The TitlePLUS policy, in addition to all other coverage analogous to the other competitor’s policy, has legal services coverage. This legal services coverage directly from the lawyer’s negligence regardless of whether or not the loss falls under one of the covered title and compliance risks. There is simply no circumstance in which a purchaser or lender protected by a TitlePLUS policy should be forced to sue their lawyer to obtain compensation for a loss suffered in relation to the transaction where the lawyer was negligent at law.

In another case, the sophisticated client had instructed the lawyer that he would handle the development issues, but the lawyer was found negligent when he failed to advise the client on the importance of the issue. The lawyer noted a one-foot reserve identified as part of the title search, advised the client of its existence, and did not undertake any further due diligence as it had been agreed the client would deal with these types of issues. As it turned out, the one-foot reserve was a greater obstacle than it normally would be, being much more costly for the client and affecting the viability and profitability of the project. This lawyer was found to be negligent in failing to emphasize the extent of the title issue and its possible consequences.The title insurance policy did not cover this issue, but here again, TitlePLUS legal services coverage would have provided the client (and lawyer) with other options.

Title insurance is not a magic bullet
Title insurance has never been a panacea for lawyers or their clients, nor is it meant to replace all due diligence. Residential policies are standardized and the various insurers have similar offerings. Commercial policies, however, run the gamut from all-inclusive coverage, to a stripped-down policy with endorsements for the specific requirements of the particular parcel of land and transaction. In addition, insurers may provide insurance to fully cover the lender, and partial or no coverage for the purchasers. They may also offer limited recovery coverage in the event of an identified and negotiated issue. Lawyers need to know and understand the differences and they need to ensure that they fully explain the advantages, conditions, and limitations of the particular policy to their clients.

It is in your best interest to ensure all intended clients are protected. TitlePLUS insurance offers one policy to cover both the purchasers and lender, to varying degrees. Other title insurers offer separate policies for purchaser and lender. Ask yourself, have all policies been obtained? Are all purchasers named as insureds? Is the lender named as an insured?

Know what’s excluded
Lawyers should be cognizant of the exclusions found in a title insurance policy. Generally, there are five standard exclusions; government action, environmental issues, aboriginal title issues, other uses of the property, and matters which the purchaser has created, accepted or consented to. This latter exclusion can be fairly broad and can include any matter which the client learns of during the negotiations or viewing of the property, even if the lawyer has no knowledge of it.

Finally, the lawyer needs to understand the extent of coverage that the policy provides. Even in the fairly standardized world of residential policies, insurers’ policy definitions vary.

Each property is unique. Real estate is an area of law that requires particular attention to the client’s intentions, circumstances and the nature and status of the property in question. Even if the house next door is perfect, the one in question may be saddled with issues the client does not anticipate and may result in a claim against the lawyer when it is later discovered − even if title insurance was obtained. The lawyer’s role remains as important in the real estate transaction today as before, and maybe even more important, now that transactions are becoming more complicated and property values have risen sky-high.

This article appeared in the September 2014 issue of LAWPRO Magazine. All past LAWPRO Magazine articles can be found at www.lawpro.ca/magazinearchives

Does your firm have a social media policy?

October 15, 2014 By: VictoriaCaruso Category: Uncategorized

So your firm has one or more social media accounts they use to deliver its message. But do you have a social media policy for your employees to use? In this day and age, many of your employees have personal (Facebook) and professional (LinkedIn) accounts that may be effectively associated with the firm, based on the employee’s sharing of information. It’s best to have a general guideline to help the lawyers and staff at your firm know the risks and to guide them through how their online activity may affect their professional lives.

A few points to consider when creating a policy or guideline:

  1. Firm culture
    Keep in mind the culture that has been built in your firm over the years. Instill messages in the document that are consistent with the firm vision, values and mission. Review other firms’ social media policies when doing your research.
  2. Partner/executive and department input
    Once the drafting process has begun, ask your partners, executive team and departments for any input they may have from their experiences.

    Have a meeting with other employees in your company as you start to get the process rolling. You may not be able to have everyone involved, but larger firms should be sure to have HR, communications and IT present.

  3. Personal vs. professional
    Remind lawyers and other staff to be good online citizens and to be mindful of what they post, especially when their accounts name the firm as their place of employment.
  4. Make it short
    Keep your policy short and easy to read. Remember this policy is for all members of the firm, who will have different levels of experience with social media. If it’s too long and complex, it will cause confusion for your readers and will be ignored.
  5. Clarify policy rules
    Remind employees of the privacy policies implemented at your firm. If your goal is to have more employee engagement and active voices on social media being clear helps.
  6. Train employees on the policy
    Now that your social media policy is in place, it’s time to hold a training session for lawyers and staff. Run through why you’ve created this policy, the contents of it and where they can find it. This will help motivate employees to get started and give them clear expectations up front.

This article appeared in the September 2014 “The Changing Face of the Profession” issue of LAWPRO Magazine. All past LAWPRO Magazine articles can be found at
www.lawpro.ca/magazinearchives

Business loan collection scam using the name Nai Chi Kimchi

October 15, 2014 By: FraudInfo Category: Confirmed frauds

A California firm notified us that they received an email from the purported Nai Chi Kimchi looking to retain them with regards to a breach of a business loan agreement.

This is a classic bad cheque scam that presents as legal matter requiring the assistance of a lawyer. In this scam lawyers will be duped into wiring real funds from their trust accounts after depositing a fake cheque received as payment from the debtor (who is part of the fraud). See our Confirmed Fraud Page for more of an explanation of how these frauds work and other names associated with it , and our Fraud Fact Sheet for a list the red flags of a bogus legal matter that is really a fraud.

Here is the initial LinkedIn contact email sent by the fraudster to the lawyer:

Sent from LinkedIn for iPhone

http://lnkd.in/ios

On 10/09/14 02:50PM, Nai Chi Kimchi wrote:
——————–
I want to inquire if your firm handles Business Litigation/ breach of contract cases. A referral will be welcomed if this is not your area of practice.

Regards

Nai Chi Kimchi

Replying to the message brought this emailed reply:

Thank you for your prompt response to my inquiry. I live in Japan, while My friend John Humphrey lives in California. As a result of time difference it is difficult to reach you. He is a citizen of the United State. I loan him $500,000.00. We both agreed under a period of time to pay back the money i loan him, he has paid me $150,000.00 but still owing $350,000.00 and the stipulated time for completion of payment has long elapsed. This is the reason why I contacted you. I know for sure my friend has the financial means to pay the balance he owes me.

Thus, I request your legal services to enforce him or a court order compelling him to remit balance he owed me.

AMOUNT OWED : $450,000 PLUS INTEREST

I expect this to be resolved in a timely manner. Sequel to this, if you are happy to proceed, kindly send me a copy of your retainer and if the terms are acceptable I will sign so we can commence the process without delay.

Thank you for your anticipated cooperation and professionalism.

Nai Chi Kimchi
1-8-5 Sumiyoshi-Minamimachi. Higashinada-ku, Kobe, 6580041 JAPAN
Phone : 0-78-822-2144 / Fax : 0-78-822-2144

How to handle a real or suspected fraud Read the rest of this entry →

Commercial debt collection scam using the names Eric Stricker and Koch Guitar Electronics

October 15, 2014 By: FraudInfo Category: Confirmed frauds

Firms in Ontario and Kansas notified us that they received an email from the purported Eric Stricker of Koch Guitar Electronics looking to retain them with regards to a commercial debt collection.

This is a classic bad cheque scam that presents as legal matter requiring the assistance of a lawyer. In this scam lawyers will be duped into wiring real funds from their trust accounts after depositing a fake cheque received as payment from the debtor (who is part of the fraud). See our Confirmed Fraud Page for more of an explanation of how these frauds work and to see other names associated with it. Our Fraud Fact Sheet lists the red flags of a bogus legal matter that is really a fraud.

Here is the initial email from the fraudster to the lawyer:

From: Koch Guitar Electronics [mailto:gukochelectronic@dishmail.net]
Sent: Monday, October 13, 2014 9:02 AM
Subject: Attn: Legal Representation

Dear Counsel,

Our company needs a contractual dispute and business litigation matter handled. If you take such cases please kindly respond for more details.

Eric Stricker
Chief Operating Officer
Koch Guitar Electronics
gukochelectronics@dishmail.net

How to handle a real or suspected fraud Read the rest of this entry →

Commercial debt collection scam using the name Masaru Osamu

October 15, 2014 By: FraudInfo Category: Confirmed frauds

An Ontario firm notified us that they received an email from the purported Masaru Osamu looking to retain them with regards to a commercial debt collection.

This is a classic bad cheque scam that presents as legal matter requiring the assistance of a lawyer. In this scam lawyers will be duped into wiring real funds from their trust accounts after depositing a fake cheque received as payment from the debtor (who is part of the fraud). See our Confirmed Fraud Page for more of an explanation of how these frauds work and to see other names associated with it. Our Fraud Fact Sheet lists the red flags of a bogus legal matter that is really a fraud.

Here is the initial email from the fraudster to the lawyer:

From: MASARU OSAMU daisukeholdings.ltd@outlook.com
Date: Tue, Oct 14, 2014 at 9:46 AM
Subject: Inquiry
To: “..”@localhost

I wish to request for your legal services and possible representation on a legal matter involving failure to fulfill contractual obligations. Please do let me know if your office is currently accepting new clients.

Regards,
Masaru Osama

How to handle a real or suspected fraud Read the rest of this entry →

Separation agreement scam using the name Margareth Johnson

October 15, 2014 By: FraudInfo Category: Confirmed frauds

An Ontario firm notified us that they received an email from the purported Margareth Johnson looking to retain them with regards to a collecting overdue payments resulting from a separation agreement.

This is a classic bad cheque scam that presents as legal matter requiring the assistance of a lawyer. In this scam lawyers will be duped into wiring real funds from their trust accounts after depositing a fake cheque received as payment from the debtor (who is part of the fraud). See our Confirmed Fraud Page for more of an explanation of how these frauds work and to see other names associated with it. Our Fraud Fact Sheet lists the red flags of a bogus legal matter that is really a fraud.

Here is the initial email sent by the fraudster to the lawyer’s intake form:

Name: Margareth Johnson
Company Name:
City:
State/Country: United States of America
Email Address: margarethljohnson@gmail.com
Phone: (956)-307-3939
Comments:
My name is Margareth L Johnson. I am contacting your firm in regards to a divorce settlement (Collaborative Law Agreement) with my ex-husband Yoshito Johnson who resides in Canada at the moment. Please contact me via [ margarethljohnson@gmail.com ] for more details.

Replying to the email brought this response:

Good day to you and thank you for your response to my inquiry. Currently am living in Japan for an assignment on Compassion’s Christian Child Development Projects. I would have called you on the phone with the time difference (+13hrs EST) it is a little bit difficult to gauge the best time to reach you.

My Full names and date of birth.
Margareth Lee Johnson.
20 October, 1961

Ex- Husband full name and date of birth.
Yoshito Johnson
12th March, 1964

We agreed under this Collaborative Law Agreement for a one time cash settlement of $748,450.00 to his credit, he has paid me $289,450.00. He is aware of my intention to seek legal actions. I will be pleased to provide further information on this matter on request. I expect this to be a non-litigation matter. I have already advised him I am planning on retaining your firm. I would like you to get back to me for us to discuss the case as well as the contingency attorney fees that will involve. If possible send me the contingency attorney fees agreement so that we can proceed.

Thank you and have a pleasant day.

Regards,
Margareth Johnson

How to handle a real or suspected fraud Read the rest of this entry →

Commercial debt collection scam using the names Edward Yoshimura and Naito Steel & Pipe Co

October 15, 2014 By: FraudInfo Category: Confirmed frauds

Firms in Ontario and California notified us that they received an email from the purported Edward Yoshimura of Naito Steel & Pipe Co looking to retain them with regards to a commercial debt collection.

This is a classic bad cheque scam that presents as legal matter requiring the assistance of a lawyer. In this scam lawyers will be duped into wiring real funds from their trust accounts after depositing a fake cheque received as payment from the debtor (who is part of the fraud). See our Confirmed Fraud Page for more of an explanation of how these frauds work and to see other names associated with it. Our Fraud Fact Sheet lists the red flags of a bogus legal matter that is really a fraud.

Here is the initial email from the fraudster to the lawyer:

From: Edward Yoshimura [mailto:edwardy223@hotmail.com]
Sent: Tuesday, October 14, 2014 3:45 PM
To: “..”@localhost
Subject: Contract Case

We wish to request for legal services and possible representation on a legal matter involving failure to fulfill contractual obligations. Please do let me know if your office is currently accepting new clients.

Regard:

Edward Yoshimura

Replying to the email brought this response:

Thank you for responding to our email. With regard to the above subject matter, we placed an order for some goods from Airgas, Inc. back in August, 2013 and the terms of the sales contract requires we to pay 50% of the total cost of the ordered goods before delivery and the balance after we have received the same goods. However, after we paid the initial deposit, we did not receive any goods as required. The goods ought to be delivered in September, 2013. More time was given to them to deliver the goods which they were still unable to meet with. Hence, we requested for a refund.

We have made several efforts to have them refund the initial deposit, but to no avail. We have therefore decided to resort to legal means since there is an existing agreement prior to the transaction. Find below details of the supplier for your conflict check.

Airgas, Inc.
1415 Grand Avenue
San Marcos, CA 92078-2405

We have suffered so much loss as a result of this failed transaction and we are ready to proceed with litigation if the need should arise. Let us know the best way to have this issue tackled and we will comply as long as we get results. Furthermore, we have concerns and would like you to respond in detail in your reply.

Are they any foibles you see in this case?
If litigation is involved, the distance gives us some concern with regards to court appearances. How can this be handled?
How much is your legal fee? Do you charge on hourly basis or contingency?
What should we expect from you? Any guarantees?

Please advise on your assessment of this case. A quick response will be appreciated.

Best Regards,
Edward Yoshimura
Purchasing Manager
Naito Steel & Pipe Co. Ltd
Shin Kokusai Bldg. 4-1, Marunouchi 3 Chome,
Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 100-8366, Japan
Tel: +81(0) 345 209 2228

How to handle a real or suspected fraud Read the rest of this entry →