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Resolutions for better matter and file management

December 19, 2014 By: TimLemieux Category: Law Practice Management, Uncategorized

ResFileMgmt

Effective file management provides the foundation for timely, valuable client service and appropriate management of client matters. Here are some resolutions to help you complete the critical steps in file management:

  • I will complete a conflicts check before opening a file: Conflicts of interest can lead to ugly and expensive malpractice claims. The best time to catch and avoid a conflicts claim is during a thorough conflicts search before a file is opened. A thorough search looks for conflicts involving both the client(s) and others connected with a matter.
  • I will open a file for every matter I handle: Doing “off-books” work not only bypasses firm administrative procedures and checks, it often leads to short-cuts and mistakes. Open a file for every matter you handle to make sure that the file is properly handled.
  • I will use a tickler system for limitations periods and time sensitive tasks: Missed deadlines and procrastination are the second most common cause of malpractice claims. A formal tickler system that tracks critical deadlines and tasks is the best way to avoid missing deadlines.
  • I will have signed retainer agreements or engagement letters in all my files: Start out on the right foot with a written retainer letter or agreement. It establishes your terms of engagement and should clearly identify who the client is and what you are retained to do.
  • I will send a final reporting letter at the end of every retainer: A final reporting letter clearly signals the end of a retainer to a client. Along with a final account, it should summarize the work that was done for the client, including outlining the key terms of any documents or agreements, the outcome of the matter and any ongoing steps or obligations that the client has.
  • I will not handle matters I am uncomfortable with: Dabblers are more likely to face a malpractice claim. If you are unsure or hesitant about handling the matter for any reason (e.g., unfamiliar with the area of law, a potential conflict exists, a matter for a relative or friend, or a demanding or difficult client), get appropriate help or refer it to another lawyer.

Click here to see the full list of resolutions taken from New Year’s resolutions for a healthier law practice and a new you, which appeared in the December 2012 issue of LAWPRO Magazine.

Equipment purchase scam using the names Matthieu Herbert and DEME Group

December 18, 2014 By: FraudInfo Category: Confirmed frauds

Two Ontario firms notified us that they received an email from the purported Matthieu Herbert of DEME Group looking to retain them with regards to making a large commercial purchase.

This is a bad cheque scam that presents as legal matter requiring the assistance of a lawyer. In this scam lawyers will be duped into wiring real funds from their trust accounts after depositing a fake cheque received as payment from the purchaser (who is part of the fraud). See our Confirmed Fraud Page for more of an explanation of how these frauds work and to see other names associated with it. Our Fraud Fact Sheet lists the red flags of a bogus legal matter that is really a fraud.

Here is the initial contact email sent by the fraudster to the lawyer:

From: Matthieu Herbert [mailto:info-deme@groupmail.com]
Sent: Monday, December 15, 2014 9:18 PM
To:
Subject: Enquiry…

Hi

Does your firm handle purchase & sale transactions and agreements? I f not, a referral will be appreciated

Matthieu Herbert
Head of Purchase & Logistics
Dredging, Environmental & Marine Engineering
DEME Group
Head Office: Haven 1025Scheldedijk, 30 2070 Zwijndrecht, Belgium
Logistics: Level 21,Center, 99 Queen’s Road Central Hong Kong
Direct Line: +3289680239

Replying to the email brought this response:

I am in the process of selling a dredger to a buyer residing in your area. I need an attorney to
help me draft a purchase and sale agreement for the transaction. I have attached some necessary details
of the dredger for your review, please advise on your rate, retainer fee and forward to me your retainer
agreement to sign. Find below the name of the proposed buyer for your conflict check.

Proposed Buyer:
St Lawrence Marine & Dredging
87 Fitzsimmons Rd
Lansdowne, ON Canada

Matthieu Herbert
Head of Purchase & Logistics
Dredging, Environmental & Marine Engineering
DEME Group
Head Office: Haven 1025Scheldedijk, 30 2070 Zwijndrecht, Belgium
Logistics: Level 21,Center, 99 Queen’s Road Central Hong Kong
Direct Line: +3289680239

How to handle a real or suspected fraud

If you have been targeted by any of these frauds, please forward any of the emails and supporting documents that you have received to fraudinfo@lawpro.ca.

If you suspect you are acting on a matter that might be a fraud, call LAWPRO at 1-800-410-1013 (416-598-5899). We will talk you through the common fraud scenarios we are seeing and help you spot red flags that may indicate you are being duped. This will help you ask appropriate questions of your client to determine if the matter is legitimate or not. If the matter you are acting on turns out to be a fraud and there is a potential claim, we will work with you to prevent the fraud and minimize potential claims costs.

What can you do to help put a stop to the fraud attempt? You can simply stop replying to the fraudster’s emails or inform them that you suspect fraud and will not act on the matter (or will take no further actions on the matter). You can report the fraudsters email addresses to the email hosting company. If you have a fraudulent cheque you can destroy it or send it to the fraud department of the financial institution, which may wish to see it. In Canada, you can report the fraud to the Canadian Anti-Fraud Centre.

We are often asked if it is worthwhile to report the fraud attempt to the police in the hopes of helping catch the fraudsters. You can certainly report the fraud to your local or federal law enforcement agencies, but unfortunately it is often difficult, expensive and time consuming for them to attempt to shut down these online fraud perpetrators (though there are some successes).

If you have been successfully duped, please immediately notify LAWPRO as there may be a claim against you. Instructions on how to report a claim are here.

For more immediate updates on fraud and claims prevention, subscribe to the email or RSS feed updates from LAWPRO’s AvoidAClaim blog.

Fraud Fact Sheet More fraud prevention information and resources are available on the practicePRO Fraud page, including the Fraud Fact Sheet, a handy reference for lawyers and law firm staff that describes the common frauds and the red flags that can help identify them.

Resolutions to avoid litigation claims

December 18, 2014 By: TimLemieux Category: Litigation, Uncategorized

Limitations1
Limitations2

  • I will enter target dates a few days early to avoid last minute complications. Unforeseen circumstances can arise on the day a document needs to be filed. Setting your target date a few days before a deadline could prevent a snow storm, traffic jam or sick-at-home clerk resulting in a missed deadline.
  • I will familiarize myself with the Limitations Act, 2002. We continue to see claims related to lawyers’ unfamiliarity with the new limitations rules. Take the time to review the rules and the related jurisprudence: See, for example, practicePRO’s limitations resources at practicepro.ca/limitations, and LAWPRO’s limitations casebooks, including this comprehensive review: www.practicepro.ca/ LawPROmag/LessonsLearned_LimitationsAct.pdf
  • I will avoid administrative dismissals. Rule 48 of the Rules of Civil Procedure allows for the administrative dismissal of non-progressing actions. Be sure to take timely steps to move litigation forward.
  • I will talk to my clients more often and not rely on email so much. Lawyers are increasingly using emails to communicate with clients, and this is resulting in misunderstandings. Clients and lawyers read things into emails that aren’t there, miss the meaning of what is said, or read between the lines and make assumptions. During a long litigation matter, arrange some face-to-face meetings, or at least a phone call if distance is an issue.
  • I will make sure to have written confirmation of instructions and advice. As in all areas of law, this is a crucial to helping LAWPRO defend you in the event of a claim where you may have no recollection of the details years later. Take notes on your conversations with the client, and document in writing things like the details of settlement offers, the extent of what you will do in limited retainer cases, your advice on accepting (or not) offers, and the likelihood of winning or losing a case and the costs involved.
  • I will create more detailed docket notes. Like the resolution above, this has the benefit of helping protect you in the event of a claim (e.g. “Conference with client re risks and costs of litigation” is much better than just “Conference with client re lawsuit.”) It also will help you determine if you are making money on a particular case by giving you a better understanding of the amount of time you and your staff are spending on it.
  • I will review my file before closing it to make sure every task is accounted for. It’s a good idea to review your file before closing it and/or putting it into storage to ensure that nothing still needs to be done. If there is and it is part of your retainer, you should ensure that you complete the outstanding work. If it is not, confirm in writing to the client that it is the client’s responsibility to complete the work.

Click here to see the full list of resolutions taken from New Year’s resolutions for a healthier law practice and a new you, which appeared in the December 2012 issue of LAWPRO Magazine.

Resolutions to better set and control client expectations

December 17, 2014 By: TimLemieux Category: Communication errors

ClientEx

Clients can be demanding and will sometimes have expectations that will be unreasonable. Unmet expectations, even if they are totally unreasonable, are a recipe for unhappy clients. Setting and controlling client expectations is one of the best things you can do to ensure that you have a happy and satisfied client at each stage and the conclusion of a matter. Follow these resolutions to better set and control your clients’ expectations:

  • I will carefully explain how the matter will proceed: While you may have handled a particular type of matter hundreds of times before, remember that your client is going through it for the first time. Make sure the client understands the process and steps that will occur as the matter proceeds.
  • I will avoid legal jargon when explaining things to my clients: Don’t use legal jargon when explaining things to clients as it may confuse them.
  • I will give the client a realistic indication of how long the matter will take: Clients will want their matter resolved as quickly as possible. Give them a true indication of how long the matter will take, and highlight any issues that might arise and delay a resolution of the matter.
  • I will provide the client with a full picture of all costs and disbursements: Clients don’t want to spend money on legal fees and they will want to keep fees as low as possible. If you quote a range of fees they will remember the lower number. Give your clients a clear explanation of all fees and disbursements that they will or might incur. Be honest here – don’t quote a lower cost to please them. In the litigation context you should include a warning that they could be responsible for paying the fees of the opposing party.
  • I will clearly explain to the client all possible outcomes or results: Clients always want a positive outcome to their matter. Unfortunately, not every client will get what they want. Make sure your clients have a clear appreciation of all possible outcomes, including negative or unpleasant ones.
  • I will answer all my clients’ questions to their satisfaction: Carefully listen to and address any questions your clients ask. Do the questions indicate that they don’t understand something or that there could be another relevant issue you need to give advice on? Confirm the above information and advice in writing: In a personal meeting or phone call, unsophisticated and stressed clients who have worries and financial concerns may struggle to listen and understand what you are telling them. To avoid any possible confusion, confirm important discussions and advice in writing.
  • I will immediately highlight for clients any unexpected changes that arise: Unexpected things can happen through the course of handling any matter. If something happens that will change the process, timing, costs or outcome of a matter, make sure the client is immediately made aware of the change and why it happened. Confirm this advice in writing.

Click here to see the full list of resolutions taken from New Year’s resolutions for a healthier law practice and a new you, which appeared in the December 2012 issue of LAWPRO Magazine.

Separation agreement scam using the name Karina Clark

December 17, 2014 By: FraudInfo Category: Confirmed frauds

An Ontario firm notified us that they received an email from the purported Karina Clark looking to retain them with regards to a collecting overdue payments resulting from a separation agreement.

This is a classic bad cheque scam that presents as legal matter requiring the assistance of a lawyer. In this scam lawyers will be duped into wiring real funds from their trust accounts after depositing a fake cheque received as payment from the debtor (who is part of the fraud). See our Confirmed Fraud Page for more of an explanation of how these frauds work and to see other names associated with it. Our Fraud Fact Sheet lists the red flags of a bogus legal matter that is really a fraud.

Here is the initial email sent by the fraudster to the lawyer:

From: Karina Clark [mailto:karina.clark007@outlook.com]
Sent: December-16-14 5:05 AM
Subject: Contempt Petition

Good Day,

I am making an inquiry about possible representation to enforce terms of my dissolution agreement with my former husband. Please advise if you handle such case. I will also need a referral if this case is not within your line of practice.

Yours Truly,
Karina Clark.

Replying to the email brought this response:

hank you for your response to my email. I would have visited your office if I was in the Ontario but I live in Japan while my ex spouse Steven Clark who is a citizen of Canada lives in your jurisdiction. I and my ex spouse fell in love during His UN deployment visit to Japan 1995 and got married 19th of July, 1996, at Fukushima Family Court. He is a medical practitioner for the UN. Due to my hearing problem (Disability) it is difficult to talk to you on phone, would have loved to discuss this matter on phone, but I can read and write very well. If need be it to testify in the United State I will make myself available at that time.

I and my ex spouse agreed under a separation agreement incorporated, merged into and made part of the court order for a settlement of Child Support, Spouse Support and Medical Support of $1,036,570.00 USD he has only paid $350,500.00 February 18th, 2013 but still owing $686,070.00 and the stipulated time for the completion of payment May 17th,2013 has long elapsed.

This is the reason why I contacted your firm as there is already an agreement in place. Find Attached in PDF Court Order and Separation Agreement. Thus, I request your firm’s legal service to enforce the court order compelling him to remit balance owed me. Kindly send me a copy of your attorney-client retainer agreement and if the terms are acceptable I will sign so we can commence the process without delay, Immediately I receive the retainer agreement I will Sign and return.

Yours Faithfully,
Karina.

How to handle a real or suspected fraud

If you have been targeted by any of these frauds, please forward any of the emails and supporting documents that you have received to fraudinfo@lawpro.ca.

If you suspect you are acting on a matter that might be a fraud, call LAWPRO at 1-800-410-1013 (416-598-5899). We will talk you through the common fraud scenarios we are seeing and help you spot red flags that may indicate you are being duped. This will help you ask appropriate questions of your client to determine if the matter is legitimate or not. If the matter you are acting on turns out to be a fraud and there is a potential claim, we will work with you to prevent the fraud and minimize potential claims costs.

What can you do to help put a stop to the fraud attempt? You can simply stop replying to the fraudster’s emails or inform them that you suspect fraud and will not act on the matter (or will take no further actions on the matter). You can report the fraudsters email addresses to the email hosting company. If you have a fraudulent cheque you can destroy it or send it to the fraud department of the financial institution, which may wish to see it. In Canada, you can report the fraud to the Canadian Anti-Fraud Centre.

We are often asked if it is worthwhile to report the fraud attempt to the police in the hopes of helping catch the fraudsters. You can certainly report the fraud to your local or federal law enforcement agencies, but unfortunately it is often difficult, expensive and time consuming for them to attempt to shut down these online fraud perpetrators (though there are some successes).

If you have been successfully duped, please immediately notify LAWPRO as there may be a claim against you. Instructions on how to report a claim are here.

For more immediate updates on fraud and claims prevention, subscribe to the email or RSS feed updates from LAWPRO’s AvoidAClaim blog.

Fraud Fact Sheet More fraud prevention information and resources are available on the practicePRO Fraud page, including the Fraud Fact Sheet, a handy reference for lawyers and law firm staff that describes the common frauds and the red flags that can help identify them.

Resolutions to avoid real estate claims

December 16, 2014 By: TimLemieux Category: Real estate

REclaims1

REclaims2

  • I will ensure I meet with my clients in person at least once: In most real estate practices the staff handle many aspects of the client’s matter. However, ultimate responsibility still lies with the supervising lawyer. Take the time to meet with the client in person to review the transaction and understand the client instructions, particularly with respect to the client’s intended uses of the property. Not every matter is straightforward, and you don’t want to have to be addressing a problem that was only noticed the day the deal is to be closed, or never noticed at all.
  • I will remember that the lender is also my client in most residential transactions: Lawyers often forget, because they deal face-to-face with the purchasers, that the lender is also their client and is owed a duty of care. You have to provide any information to the lender that is material to the transaction. The lending clients can bring claims against lawyers for failing to disclose all the relevant information they knew (or ought to have known).
  • I will make sure I take my instructions from the person with the true interest at risk in the transaction: At times it may be easier to gather information relevant to the transaction from intermediaries like a mortgage broker or real estate agent. However, in the event of a claim lawyers need to be able to show that they took their instructions from the person with the value at risk in the transaction, or at least have documentation from that person authorizing the lawyer to take instructions from the intermediary in all circumstances.
  • I will document my conversations with and instructions from the client: This is the best defence you’ll have against a malpractice claim. The client may only be involved in one or two real estate transactions in their lifetime and will remember the details, while the lawyer who sees countless transactions will likely have little specific recollection of one matter. Keep notes of your conversations with the client and document what you discussed and what actions you took in a detailed reporting letter to the client.
  • I will not give my electronic registration password to my clerks or anyone else: Only the lawyer who received the electronic registration credentials provided by the Ministry of Government Services is entitled to use the lawyer disc and password to register an instrument on title using the electronic system. And yet LAWPRO sees claims in which the lawyer allowed (or claims not to have been aware) that someone else in the office was using the password. As tempting as it may be in a busy real estate practice to let the clerk register instruments requiring a lawyer’s electronic signature…don’t.

Click here to see the full list of resolutions taken from New Year’s resolutions for a healthier law practice and a new you, which appeared in the December 2012 issue of LAWPRO Magazine.

In the praticePRO Lending Library: The Law Firm Associate’s Guide to Connecting with Your Colleagues

December 15, 2014 By: TimLemieux Category: Law Practice Management

Connecting Colleagues

The book will help associates learn how to effectively work together with their colleagues to achieve high levels of productivity and success in the law office. While work relationships can be challenging, this guide shows associates how they can communicate and maintain positive work relationships. The companion training manual puts the book’s ideas into action with practice exercises and techniques that can be customized specifically to personality type and experience level.

The practicePRO Lending Library is a free resource for Ontario lawyers of more than 100 books on a wide variety of law practice management related topics. You can see a full listing of our books here. You may borrow a book in person or via e-mail.

The practicePRO Library is located in our office at 250 Yonge Street, Suite 3101 in Toronto and can be visited during our regular business hours (Mon to Fri, 8:30 to 5:00). We invite you to come by anytime (please email in advance)to peruse our selection. All titles in the practicePRO Lending Library can be shipped to Ontario lawyers at our expense, and returned at yours after three weeks.

If you would like to borrow this or any other book please email us. Most of our titles are also available from the American Bar Association Web Store or the major booksellers here in Canada.

Resolutions to avoid criminal law claims

December 14, 2014 By: TimLemieux Category: Criminal Law

criminal1

criminal2

  • I will take the time to ensure the client understands my recommendations: Failing to effectively communicate with the client is just as much a claims pitfall in criminal law as in other areas. This could be because of the rushed nature of many “courthouse steps” conversations, or the fact that the lawyer’s years of experience on cases may obscure the fact that the client doesn’t fully understand the course of action the lawyer recommends. There is a risk that clients may later regret their choices and make a claim against the lawyer. To guard against this, be sure to provide detailed information about your analysis of the case, the plea options available, your recommendations, and a reminder that the plea decision is the client’s alone. It may not be required to document ALL your communications with the client, but it is good practice to do so as much as possible.
  • I will discuss with the client the potential consequences of pleading guilty (and document it): While criminal law is traditionally a low claims-risk area of law, those claims we do see often involve a failure by the lawyer to communicate all the long term ramifications of pleading guilty to a charge. For instance, a truck driver pleading guilty to DWI may find out later that he may have difficulties with his job if he can’t cross the U.S. border. Be sure to document your conversations with the client in this regard.
  • I will promptly notify LAWPROof any appeals based on “ineffective assistance of counsel.”: A client may appeal a guilty verdict based on grounds that the trial lawyer provided ineffective assistance. The appellate lawyer may ask the trial lawyer to sign an affidavit supporting this ground of appeal. If asked to do so, you should call LAWPRO right away so that we can advise on whether it is necessary and if so, how to do so without admitting negligence.
  • I will meet with my client in my office whenever possible: Client meetings held at the courthouse while awaiting appearances sometimes lead to poor documentation of the content of the meeting, and incomplete understanding, by the client of what was explained. Wherever possible, and especially where charges are serious, you should make the effort to hold dedicated meetings at your office to discuss important issues if a client is not in custody.

Click here to see the full list of resolutions taken from New Year’s resolutions for a healthier law practice and a new you, which appeared in the December 2012 issue of LAWPRO Magazine.

Resolutions to capture more time (and make more money)

December 12, 2014 By: TimLemieux Category: Law Practice Management

timecapture
With technology and a few tricks, you can increase your billable time by catching more of the actual time you spend on tasks. This gives you more time to bill, which will ultimately transfer to a better bottom line. Here are some of the best ways you can use technology to capture and bill more time:

  • I will use electronic timesheets and enter my own time: Paper timesheets are error-prone and inefficient because they require double entry. The efficiency, extra speed, and greater accuracy of entering your own time on electronic timesheets make this resolution a no-brainer.
  • I will enter time contemporaneously as I complete tasks throughout the day: Trying to create time entries for work done in the distant past is time-consuming, and not likely to be very accurate or complete. Studies have shown that lawyers gain up to 20 per cent in their billable time when they docket their time contemporaneously to doing their work.
  • I will review my dockets and “to do” list at the end of the day: At the end of the day spend a few minutes reviewing your dockets, and make any necessary corrections or additions while things are still fresh in your mind.
  • I will use standard billing codes and include details in my dockets: Many law office accounting programs have standard billing codes, for example, “conference with client,” or “review of correspondence.” While these codes are convenient (and you should use them for this reason), they don’t include enough detail. Having detailed time entries is a great record of the work you did on a file, and for communicating to the client the details of that work. A detailed entry should look something like this: “telephone conference with client re details of weekend access problems.” Or, “drafting of correspondence to client confirming instructions to skip zoning search.” Clients will have fewer fee complaints when your accounts have detailed time entries.
  • I will record every minute I spend on a file: Don’t pre-judge and write off time spent on a file by not recording it on the day it was done. Wait until your final or interim bill is prepared on the file, at which time you can properly judge all the factors that determine what should be billed, including the time that was spent on it, the outcome, etc. You can easily make adjustments to an account by editing it at this stage. And, if you do elect to write-off certain billing entries, show them on the bill, as they are still part of the work done for the client, notwithstanding the write-off.
  • I will docket all my administrative and other non-billable time: To properly evaluate where your time is being spent, your efficiency, and ultimately the profitability of your practice, it is important that you understand how much time you are spending on non-billable tasks, and what they are. You can’t do this without knowing how much time you spend on non-billable tasks and what those tasks are.
  • I will review detailed time and billing reports for my practice: Practice management software and accounting products can give you detailed reports that breakdown your time by file, client, matter type, practice area, etc. Review these reports to better understand where your time is going, and where you can make changes in how you allocate your time.

Click here to see the full list of resolutions taken from New Year’s resolutions for a healthier law practice and a new you, which appeared in the December 2012 issue of LAWPRO Magazine.

Equipment purchase scam using the names Yuk Tak Szeto and Wang Tak Engineering

December 12, 2014 By: FraudInfo Category: Confirmed frauds

Two Ontario firms notified us that they received an email from the purported Yuk Tak Szeto of Wang Tak Engineering looking to retain them with regards to making a large commercial purchase.

This is a bad cheque scam that presents as legal matter requiring the assistance of a lawyer. In this scam lawyers will be duped into wiring real funds from their trust accounts after depositing a fake cheque received as payment from the purchaser (who is part of the fraud). See our Confirmed Fraud Page for more of an explanation of how these frauds work and to see other names associated with it. Our Fraud Fact Sheet lists the red flags of a bogus legal matter that is really a fraud.

Here is the initial contact email sent by the fraudster to the lawyer:


From: Yuk Tak Szeto [mailto:yt.szeto9@commercus.com]
Sent: Thursday, December 11, 2014 5:48 PM
Subject: Counsel

Dear Counsel,

This letter is to inquire if your law firm handles Purchase transactions and agreements in your area. A referral will be welcome if this is not your area of practice or Jurisdiction.

Sincerely,
Yuk Tak Szeto
President / CEO
WANG TAK ENGINEERING & SHIP BUILDING COMPANY LIMITED 3/F, Wang Tak Building,
85 Hing Wah Street West,
Lai Chi Kok, Kowloon,
Hong Kong

How to handle a real or suspected fraud

If you have been targeted by any of these frauds, please forward any of the emails and supporting documents that you have received to fraudinfo@lawpro.ca.

If you suspect you are acting on a matter that might be a fraud, call LAWPRO at 1-800-410-1013 (416-598-5899). We will talk you through the common fraud scenarios we are seeing and help you spot red flags that may indicate you are being duped. This will help you ask appropriate questions of your client to determine if the matter is legitimate or not. If the matter you are acting on turns out to be a fraud and there is a potential claim, we will work with you to prevent the fraud and minimize potential claims costs.

What can you do to help put a stop to the fraud attempt? You can simply stop replying to the fraudster’s emails or inform them that you suspect fraud and will not act on the matter (or will take no further actions on the matter). You can report the fraudsters email addresses to the email hosting company. If you have a fraudulent cheque you can destroy it or send it to the fraud department of the financial institution, which may wish to see it. In Canada, you can report the fraud to the Canadian Anti-Fraud Centre.

We are often asked if it is worthwhile to report the fraud attempt to the police in the hopes of helping catch the fraudsters. You can certainly report the fraud to your local or federal law enforcement agencies, but unfortunately it is often difficult, expensive and time consuming for them to attempt to shut down these online fraud perpetrators (though there are some successes).

If you have been successfully duped, please immediately notify LAWPRO as there may be a claim against you. Instructions on how to report a claim are here.

For more immediate updates on fraud and claims prevention, subscribe to the email or RSS feed updates from LAWPRO’s AvoidAClaim blog.

Fraud Fact Sheet More fraud prevention information and resources are available on the practicePRO Fraud page, including the Fraud Fact Sheet, a handy reference for lawyers and law firm staff that describes the common frauds and the red flags that can help identify them.