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Commercial debt collection scam using the names Ashford Riku and Biohit Healthcare

November 21, 2014 By: FraudInfo Category: Confirmed frauds

An Ontario firm notified us that they received an email from the purported Ashford Riku of Biohit Healthcare looking to retain them with regards to a commercial debt collection.

This is a classic bad cheque scam that presents as legal matter requiring the assistance of a lawyer. In this scam lawyers will be duped into wiring real funds from their trust accounts after depositing a fake cheque received as payment from the debtor (who is part of the fraud). See our Confirmed Fraud Page for more of an explanation of how these frauds work and to see other names associated with it. Our Fraud Fact Sheet lists the red flags of a bogus legal matter that is really a fraud.

Here is the initial email from the fraudster to the lawyer:

From: Ashford Riku [mailto:ashfordariku@biohihealthcare.com]
Sent: Thursday, November 20, 2014 2:12 AM
To:
Subject: Contract Dispute

What’s the process of retrieval of funds owed to us by our client?

Yours Sincerely,
Ashford Riku * Global Diversity Director Biohit Healthcare*Laippatie 1*00880
Helsinki*Finland
Tel: +358 9 231 61063*Fax: +358 9 413 58201 www.biohithealthcare.com

How to handle a real or suspected fraud

If you have been targeted by any of these frauds, please forward any of the emails and supporting documents that you have received to fraudinfo@lawpro.ca.

If you suspect you are acting on a matter that might be a fraud, call LAWPRO at 1-800-410-1013 (416-598-5899). We will talk you through the common fraud scenarios we are seeing and help you spot red flags that may indicate you are being duped. This will help you ask appropriate questions of your client to determine if the matter is legitimate or not. If the matter you are acting on turns out to be a fraud and there is a potential claim, we will work with you to prevent the fraud and minimize potential claims costs.

If you have been successfully duped, please immediately notify LAWPRO as there may be a claim against you. Instructions on how to report a claim are here.

For more immediate updates on fraud and claims prevention, subscribe to the email or RSS feed updates from LAWPRO’s AvoidAClaim blog.

Fraud Fact Sheet More fraud prevention information and resources are available on the practicePRO Fraud page, including the Fraud Fact Sheet, a handy reference for lawyers and law firm staff that describes the common frauds and the red flags that can help identify them.

Recruiting & retaining top talent: Part 3: Money and other things

November 21, 2014 By: TimLemieux Category: Law Practice Management

Attracting the best possible lateral associates is critical to a law firm’s ability to maintain its competitive edge, financial leverage, internal succession and future success.

The January 2012 issue of LAWPRO Magazine included an article by Cleo Kirkland, a senior recruitment consultant at The Counsel Network in Toronto, which discussed what firms can do to both attract the best new talent and retain the best people they already have. It features examples of different approaches firms have take to address this challenge.

Although people work for a variety of reasons (professional fulfilment, personal challenge, desire to serve the community, meaningful work, contributing to society), the principal reason most people work is to get paid.

Even those for whom money ranks farther down the list of reasons for working are not interested in being unfairly compensated. Fair compensation is the first and most critical component of a successful recruitment and retention program. Only once this initial hurdle is cleared can a firm and its associates focus on issues of productivity and practice development.

That said, fair compensation does not always equate to top-of-market compensation. If your firm expects its lawyers to docket more than 2,000 billable hours every year, then it can and should pay top dollar. But many of today’s associates are focused on more than just compensation. They are seeking responsibility and recognition for their efforts, the chance to learn from and work with skilled practitioners, professional growth and development, some measure of control over
their personal and professional lives, an opportunity to have a hand in the firm’s evolution, and to receive timely and thoughtful feedback.

The old law firm maxim that “no news is good news” simply does not work anymore and is, in fact, a fail-safe way of having associates walk out the door “out of the blue.” On the question of bonuses, many firms offer their associates plans that are intended to reinforce and reward the principles valued by the firm. If your firm only cares about financial profitability, then bonuses on billable hours alone will suffice. Too many firms claim they want their associates to contribute in ways beyond the billable hour but only reward those who are exceptionally profitable.

Inconsistent recognition programs are a guaranteed path to high associate turnover.

Recruiting & retaining top talent: Part 2 – How to be a choice law firm

November 20, 2014 By: TimLemieux Category: Law Practice Management

Attracting the best possible lateral associates is critical to a law firm’s ability to maintain its competitive edge, financial leverage, internal succession and future success.

The January 2012 issue of LAWPRO Magazine included an article by Cleo Kirkland, a senior recruitment consultant at The Counsel Network in Toronto, which discussed what firms can do to both attract the best new talent and retain the best people they already have. It features examples of different approaches firms have take to address this challenge.

Becoming a law firm of choice requires both a clear understanding of exactly what associates want and a strategy to provide them with the platform through which they can achieve their professional goals. Assessing what superstars are seeking and figuring out how your firm is best positioned to respond is crucial to any recruitment and retention strategy.

A law firm is an employer of choice when its lawyers believe they are working at a great firm and tell people as much. The best associates do their due diligence and ask the lawyers employed at the firm what it is like to work there. They also ask trusted friends and advisors (including legal recruiters) about the reputation of the firm and the likelihood that it will deliver on the career opportunities promised.

Stars will ask the difficult questions about work platform, career trajectory and fit. Strong indicators that a firm is an employer of choice include:

  • it has positive name recognition on the street;
  • prospective candidates and clients tend to choose the firm over others;
  • there is a low turnover rate of top performers;
  • lawyers at the firm deliver a consistent message on why the firm is a great place to work;
  • there is a record of ‘recruiting back’ former associates and partners to the firm;
  • the firm appears in the “best” lists of legal publications such as Lexpert; and,
  • legal recruiters speak positively of the firm.

Law firms of choice consistently have the most effective recruiting and retention programs. Those programs may vary from firm to firm, but what all of them have in common is that they recognize associates financially, create an exceptional working environment and have a clear understanding of what their associates want (and why some of them leave).

Commercial debt collection scam using the names Toshihiko Nunokawa and Toko Electrical Construction

November 20, 2014 By: FraudInfo Category: Confirmed frauds

An Ontario firm notified us that they received an email from the purported Toshihiko Nunokawa of Toko Electrical Construction looking to retain them with regards to a commercial debt collection.

This is a classic bad cheque scam that presents as legal matter requiring the assistance of a lawyer. In this scam lawyers will be duped into wiring real funds from their trust accounts after depositing a fake cheque received as payment from the debtor (who is part of the fraud). See our Confirmed Fraud Page for more of an explanation of how these frauds work and to see other names associated with it. Our Fraud Fact Sheet lists the red flags of a bogus legal matter that is really a fraud.

Here is the initial email from the fraudster to the lawyer:

From: Toshihiko Nunokawa [mailto:toshnuno00@outlook.com]
Sent: Sunday, November 16, 2014 10:10 AM
Subject: I am interested in your services.

I am interested in your services, Please confirm if your services are available

Best Regards
Toshihiko Nunokawa
Kojima Law Offices

Replying to the email brought this response:

Thanks for the responds, Our Client is Toko Electrical Construction company here in Japan and they have customers all over North America and Canada, they sell their product to most companies in North America but distance and time factor as cause delay for them to receive payment from customers.

We want to retain your service to receive payment from our customer in your jurisdiction, Scope of work, customer will make payment to you or your firm for goods we supplied them there is no law suit involve, it sprightly Trust account receivable, our cause of action to retain your service is that customers are always corporative when they know the account representative are lawyers or a law firm, this way there will be this way there will be no delay receiving payment. Our client have had so much delays in receiving payment from customers causing them thousands of dollars and delays in productions, payment range from $200K-650,000.00USD these will be of great benefit to you as our client are a multimillion dollars company our client have discussed this with their customers whom are ready to start making payment.

If you require the name of the customers to conduct your conflict check below

LUX Electric Contractors – Toronto, ON

Best Regards
Toshihiko Nunokawa
Kojima Law Offices
Gobancho Kataoka Bldg. 4F
Gobancho 2-7 Chiyoda-ku
Tokyo 102-0076 Japan

How to handle a real or suspected fraud

If you have been targeted by any of these frauds, please forward any of the emails and supporting documents that you have received to fraudinfo@lawpro.ca.

If you suspect you are acting on a matter that might be a fraud, call LAWPRO at 1-800-410-1013 (416-598-5899). We will talk you through the common fraud scenarios we are seeing and help you spot red flags that may indicate you are being duped. This will help you ask appropriate questions of your client to determine if the matter is legitimate or not. If the matter you are acting on turns out to be a fraud and there is a potential claim, we will work with you to prevent the fraud and minimize potential claims costs.

If you have been successfully duped, please immediately notify LAWPRO as there may be a claim against you. Instructions on how to report a claim are here.

For more immediate updates on fraud and claims prevention, subscribe to the email or RSS feed updates from LAWPRO’s AvoidAClaim blog.

Fraud Fact Sheet More fraud prevention information and resources are available on the practicePRO Fraud page, including the Fraud Fact Sheet, a handy reference for lawyers and law firm staff that describes the common frauds and the red flags that can help identify them.

Recruiting & retaining top talent: Part 1 – Recruiting smarter

November 20, 2014 By: TimLemieux Category: Law Practice Management

Attracting the best possible lateral associates is critical to a law firm’s ability to maintain its competitive edge, financial leverage, internal succession and future success.

The January 2012 issue of LAWPRO Magazine included an article by Cleo Kirkland, a senior recruitment consultant at The Counsel Network in Toronto, which discussed what firms can do to both attract the best new talent and retain the best people they already have. It features examples of different approaches firms have take to address this challenge.

A common mistake firms make is to identify needs only when they become crises, i.e., when there is an immediate and pressing position that needs to be filled. Instead of this reactive approach, firms should forecast forward and identify their needs over the next several years in order to ensure a constant flow of the right people. Knowing who might be favourably inclined to join your firm and when and how to initiate contact with them is one of the best ways a focused recruiting process can deliver value to a firm. A strategic recruitment plan will infinitely increase your firm’s chances of hiring and keeping the best.

Simply placing an ad in the Ontario Reports (or an equivalent publication) typically results in nothing more than a large number of unsuitable candidates. No doubt some firms have had great luck in catching a top associate who has gone on to become a leader in his or her field. But the chance of coming across the right candidate at just the right time, persuading her to join your firm and finding that she is a good fit is rare and the cost of getting it wrong is high.

Targeted brochures and website pages, a designated recruitment/professional development director and a formal employee referral program can all be strong components of a firm’s overall recruitment strategy. Use your firm and other legal recruitment websites to post openings. Encourage partners and associates to actively network at conferences and industry events that are likely to be frequented by top performers. Cultivate relationships with law school career offices and legal recruiters. Develop a ‘story’ about your firm that delivers a consistent message to the marketplace about who you are and where you are going, and spread the word!

Commercial equipment purchase scam using the name Ryan Robert

November 19, 2014 By: FraudInfo Category: Confirmed frauds

Two Ontario firms notified us that they received an email from the purported Ryan Robert looking to retain them with regards to making a large commercial purchase.

This is a bad cheque scam that presents as legal matter requiring the assistance of a lawyer. In this scam lawyers will be duped into wiring real funds from their trust accounts after depositing a fake cheque received as payment from the purchaser (who is part of the fraud). See our Confirmed Frauds page for more of an explanation of how these frauds work and to see other names associated with it. Our Fraud Fact Sheet lists the red flags of a bogus legal matter that is really a fraud.

Here is the initial contact email sent by the fraudster to the lawyer:

From: Robert R Ryan [mailto:jimmyng@totalability.com.my]
Sent: Monday, November 17, 2014 10:27 AM
Subject: Sale Transaction

Dear Attorney

I want to inquire if your firm handles Purchase transactions and agreements. A referral will be helpful if this is not your area of practice and also provide me with your contact number and time of availability on ryanrobert@qpdrilling.com so we can discuss sometime this week.

Regards,

Ryan R Robert

How to handle a real or suspected fraud

If you have been targeted by any of these frauds, please forward any of the emails and supporting documents that you have received to fraudinfo@lawpro.ca.

If you suspect you are acting on a matter that might be a fraud, call LAWPRO at 1-800-410-1013 (416-598-5899). We will talk you through the common fraud scenarios we are seeing and help you spot red flags that may indicate you are being duped. This will help you ask appropriate questions of your client to determine if the matter is legitimate or not. If the matter you are acting on turns out to be a fraud and there is a potential claim, we will work with you to prevent the fraud and minimize potential claims costs.

If you have been successfully duped, please immediately notify LAWPRO as there may be a claim against you. Instructions on how to report a claim are here.

For more immediate updates on fraud and claims prevention, subscribe to the email or RSS feed updates from LAWPRO’s AvoidAClaim blog.

Fraud Fact Sheet More fraud prevention information and resources are available on the practicePRO Fraud page, including the Fraud Fact Sheet, a handy reference for lawyers and law firm staff that describes the common frauds and the red flags that can help identify them.

In the practicePRO Lending Library: The Lawyer’s Guide to Practice Management Systems Software

November 17, 2014 By: FraudInfo Category: Legal technology

Practice Management

What can practice management systems software do for your law practice? With the right system in place, you and your staff will have the ability to automatically route items, tasks, documents, and events to certain people based on their role in the case or matter, as well as manage deadlines, improve responsiveness to clients, reduce malpractice insurance rates, and boost overall productivity. The challenge is to find a program that best serves the needs of your firm.

Written by legal technology expert Andy Adkins, this updated guide covers the entire gamut of the latest practice management systems software, helping you gain a solid understanding of their individual capabilities and special features. You’ll learn how to obtain the software at the best price; set up the workflow in your office; obtain necessary training for staff; and much more.

The practicePRO Lending Library is a free resource for Ontario lawyers of more than 100 books on a wide variety of law practice management related topics. You can see a full listing of our books here. You may borrow a book in person or via e-mail.

The practicePRO Library is located in our office at 250 Yonge Street, Suite 3101 in Toronto and can be visited during our regular business hours (Mon to Fri, 8:30 to 5:00). We invite you to come by anytime (please email in advance)to peruse our selection. All titles in the practicePRO Lending Library can be shipped to Ontario lawyers at our expense, and returned at yours after three weeks.

If you would like to borrow this or any other book please email us. Most of our titles are also available from the American Bar Association Web Store or the major booksellers here in Canada.

Separation agreement scam using the name Annuska Eito-Eiichi

November 14, 2014 By: Nora Rock Category: Confirmed frauds

We were bcc’d on an email from the purported Annuska Eito-Eiichi looking to retain a lawyer with regard to collecting overdue payments resulting from a separation agreement.

This is a classic bad cheque scam that presents as legal matter requiring the assistance of a lawyer. In this scam lawyers will be duped into wiring real funds from their trust accounts after depositing a fake cheque received as payment from the debtor (who is part of the fraud). See our Confirmed Fraud Page for more of an explanation of how these frauds work and to see other names associated with it. Our Fraud Fact Sheet lists the red flags of a bogus legal matter that is really a fraud.

Here is the initial email sent by the fraudster:

My name is Annuska Eito-Eiichi, I am contacting your law firm in regards to a divorce resolution with my ex husband (Mr. Eito-Eiichi) who now dwells in your place. I am from Nagoya, Japan where I live and had our two children with me (Akiko and Atsuko Eito Eiichi).

We had a settlement agreement for him to pay me with any associated legal fees. Since the divorce paper was read at the court here in Japan. Twenty months ago, Mr. Eito-Eiichi my ex husband had only paid me once and moved to Jurisdiction.
 
I am hereby seeking your firm to represent me in collecting the balance from him. The last message he sent me, He agreed that he would pay me the balance but not keeping up with his promise and it is my belief that a Law firm like yours is needed to help me collect this payment from my ex-husband or litigate this matter if he fails to pay as promised.

I look forward to hearing from you and any legal advice to proceed with this matter.
Thanking you in advance!
Yours Faithfully,
 
Annuska Eito Eiichi.

1-305 Itakadai, Meito-ku,
Nagoya-shi, Japan 465
Phone: 81-8039226629
Fax: 0866565432

How to handle a real or suspected fraud

If you have been targeted by any of these frauds, please forward any of the emails and supporting documents that you have received to fraudinfo@lawpro.ca.

If you suspect you are acting on a matter that might be a fraud, call LAWPRO at 1-800-410-1013 (416-598-5899). We will talk you through the common fraud scenarios we are seeing and help you spot red flags that may indicate you are being duped. This will help you ask appropriate questions of your client to determine if the matter is legitimate or not. If the matter you are acting on turns out to be a fraud and there is a potential claim, we will work with you to prevent the fraud and minimize potential claims costs.

If you have been successfully duped, please immediately notify LAWPRO as there may be a claim against you. Instructions on how to report a claim are here.

For more immediate updates on fraud and claims prevention, subscribe to the email or RSS feed updates from LAWPRO’s AvoidAClaim blog.

Fraud Fact Sheet More fraud prevention information and resources are available on the practicePRO Fraud page, including the Fraud Fact Sheet, a handy reference for lawyers and law firm staff that describes the common frauds and the red flags that can help identify them.

 

The Future of Law (Part 5 of 5): Facing the challenges and opportunities

November 14, 2014 By: TimLemieux Category: Law Practice Management

Future

On the 15th anniversary of the practicePRO program, LAWPRO asked Dan Pinnington, vice president, claims prevention and stakeholder relations, to give us his personal views on the future of legal practice. This is a topic Dan monitors constantly: One of his main tasks for many years has been to predict where the Ontario bar is headed and what minefields may be encountered on that journey. Dan’s views will be exciting for many readers, although some may be daunted by the challenges ahead, including for the regulators of lawyers. Each day this week we’ll excerpt a portion of this article from the September 2013 issue of LAWPRO Magazine, which can be read in full here.

Big changes – positive and negative – have happened to the profession in the past. We have gone through economic cycles and seen both emerging and disappearing areas of law. Court rules and procedures have changed. There was the consolidation and growth of big firms and the general movement from general practitioners to specialists. Technology has – and will continue to – change the profession and the delivery of legal services in many, and sometimes very disruptive, ways.

No one can really predict for sure how fast change will come to the legal profession, nor with any certainty, the exact changes that will occur. There are many uncertainties. What will the global economy look like? Which purchase and delivery models will develop for legal services? What type of regulatory and compliance environment will exist? To what extent will non-lawyer legal service competition move upstream into areas traditionally served by lawyers? Will the legal profession face deregulation?

The one thing that is certain is that significant changes are coming to the profession in future years and decades. They will occur at different times and in different ways in different jurisdictions. While we are very progressive in Ontario in some ways (e.g., mobility and the regulation of paralegals), we have seen relatively little impact from some of the other big changes that have occurred or are occurring elsewhere (e.g., legal process outsourcing, which has taken off in the U.S. and Europe). Considered from a global perspective, Ontario is a small and relatively isolated jurisdiction which may delay some of the changes coming our way. Our comparatively healthy economy and isolation protected us from the financial stresses and changes U.S. law firms and their clients experienced in the downturn that happened there. But when change catches up to us, it will come quickly.

It will not be easy for many to face these changes. The status quo is coming unstuck. Based on a review of what has happened elsewhere, some lawyers will lose their jobs. Entire practice groups will become unprofitable and will have to be abandoned, and some law firms will fail. Not all law school graduates will be able to get jobs. Institutions and businesses associated with the legal industry that fail to evolve will also face hard times. For lawyer associations, CPD providers and publishers that may mean offering memberships or services to non-lawyers. Our systems of adjudication (whether courts or administrative tribunals) need to adapt and change as well. They need to be simpler, more accessible, easier to navigate and faster.

Adding more self-help options could help those without lawyers. Lawyers tend to be slow to change and it seems many lawyers don’t see or won’t acknowledge the changes that are coming. Some think they are different or they say that their matters are “unique” and require the services of a lawyer. Lawyers should not fool themselves: The basic market forces of supply, demand and pricing apply to them. There is an oversupply of traditional and high (some say over) priced legal services. The client demand for lower-priced legal services is being filled by the new types of non-lawyer legal services providers.

Lawyers and law firms need to recognize that changes to the legal services market are occurring and embrace them. People will always need lawyers, or something like them, for some types of matters. For “bet the company” work there will always be a solid and lucrative demand for services, but it is a very small part of the legal services market. In the middle comes relatively sophisticated or higher value work that is not rocket science but needs a firm that has specialized and competent people. This too is a market that won’t disappear, but it is not a huge one. At the bottom is the largest part of the market – the commodity work we have discussed above: people buying houses, preparing wills, settling estates, resisting eviction or prosecution, and so on.

Many people can’t afford the legal services or get the help they need in our current system. These unmet legal needs are an opportunity that lawyers and law firms must recognize. Lawyers need to innovate and think like business people and entrepreneurs – this is what their non-lawyer competitors are doing. That will mean looking at offering new services. It almost certainly means using technology to work better, faster, cheaper, and in new ways. To compete with legal service providers who are offering commodity services, lawyers must offer more affordable services. Options include going head-to-head by retrenching to offer commodity services to clients as well or by exploring alternative fee arrangements to make existing services more affordable.

Another option is to put more effort into showing clients the value add that having a lawyer brings to legal services. This involves thinking beyond just doing one matter for a client and thinking about what the client’s longer term needs are. In other words, when a new client walks in, don’t think of just doing an incorporation that will pay a few hundred dollars in fees. This is commodity work. Think about what a new business person will need for the short- and long term growth and success of his or her business. What information could be provided to the client to help them deal with issues they may come across? What related work can be recommended to them?

Think beyond one matter – aim to become the business lawyer for the client’s new company. This is where the longer term and more lucrative fees are. A client won’t get service like this from a $50 incorporation done on a forms site.

As a closing thought, we turn to a comment Richard Susskind made in his book, The Future of Lawyers? He suggests lawyers need to move from being reactive legal problem solvers (the ambulance at the bottom of the cliff) to proactive legal risk management advisors (the fence at the top of the cliff). Consider how prepared you and your firm are to face the changes that are coming to the legal profession. No doubt you have some work to do. Take proactive steps to face these challenges and the opportunities they present.

Separation agreement scam using the name Naomi Kukrou or Kurou

November 13, 2014 By: Nora Rock Category: Confirmed frauds

An Ontario firm notified us that they received an email from the purported Naomi Kukrou/ Kurou looking to retain them with regard to a collecting overdue payments resulting from a separation agreement.

This is a classic bad cheque scam that presents as legal matter requiring the assistance of a lawyer. In this scam lawyers will be duped into wiring real funds from their trust accounts after depositing a fake cheque received as payment from the debtor (who is part of the fraud). See our Confirmed Fraud Page for more of an explanation of how these frauds work and to see other names associated with it. Our Fraud Fact Sheet lists the red flags of a bogus legal matter that is really a fraud.

Here is the initial email sent by the fraudster to the lawyer’s intake form:

I wish to file a case against my ex-husband (Ren Kurou ) for failure to complete court ordered payments of Child Support, Spousal Support, Equitable distribution and Medical support in our separation agreement. Kindly respond to confirm your readiness to assist. I am earnestly waiting for your reply. Warmest Regards, Naomi Kurou

The lawyer’s reply was met with the following response:

From: naomi kukrou [mailto:naomikukrou11@yahoo.com]

Sent: Wednesday, November 12, 2014 3:55 PM

Subject: Re: Consultation Request

Am residing in Japan for an assignment at present and my ex-spouse Ren Kurou lives in your jurisdiction. We were married and divorced in Japan with 4 children, before my ex-husband Ren Kurou relocated to Ontario. he is a business man,he is into Real Estate Management, We both agreed under a Separation Agreement incorporated, merged into and made part of the court decree for a settlement of Child Support, Spousal Support, and Medical support of $950,500.00USD, he has paid me $251,500.00USD but still owing $699,000.00USD and the stipulated time for completion of payment has long elapsed.

I am now seeking your legal assistance in collecting the balance or helping me enforce and have him honor the agreement. I will be providing further information upon your request. I have already advised Ren Kurou my ex that I will be retaining a lawyer, so he knows I am ready to take action to get my money from him. Please let me know if you require consultation fees before you advice or after the case is done, and if so I will require you to send me your retainer agreement base on an hourly rate so we can start from there. I need to know if I will be able to work with your terms.

Attached is a copy of the Separation Agreement, Decree of Divorce. This is my first time seeking for a lawyer and I believe a law firm like yours is needed to help me collect payment from him or litigate this matter if he fails to pay as promised. Please send me your retainer agreement for my review in your next email. Please be inform my English is not clear enough, let me know how we can do this?

Very Truly Your’s

Naomi Kurou.

Addres:Tokyo-to, Machida-shi Tsuruma 375-2

How to handle a real or suspected fraud

If you have been targeted by any of these frauds, please forward any of the emails and supporting documents that you have received to fraudinfo@lawpro.ca.

If you suspect you are acting on a matter that might be a fraud, call LAWPRO at 1-800-410-1013 (416-598-5899). We will talk you through the common fraud scenarios we are seeing and help you spot red flags that may indicate you are being duped. This will help you ask appropriate questions of your client to determine if the matter is legitimate or not. If the matter you are acting on turns out to be a fraud and there is a potential claim, we will work with you to prevent the fraud and minimize potential claims costs.

If you have been successfully duped, please immediately notify LAWPRO as there may be a claim against you. Instructions on how to report a claim are here.

For more immediate updates on fraud and claims prevention, subscribe to the email or RSS feed updates from LAWPRO’s AvoidAClaim blog.

Fraud Fact Sheet More fraud prevention information and resources are available on the practicePRO Fraud page, including the Fraud Fact Sheet, a handy reference for lawyers and law firm staff that describes the common frauds and the red flags that can help identify them.